Foreword
Macro
Bellows
Extension tubes
Macro filters
Macro lenses
Reverse ring
LED ringflash
Sliderrail
Tripods
Barndoors
Beautydish
Light modifiers
Reflectors
Reflectors, std
Snoots
Homemade gel
Softboxes
Speedlight gels
Umbrellas
Umbrellas, white
Umbrellas, silver
Umbrellas, golden
Backgrounds
Cameras
My studio
Flashmeters
Night photography
Stands
Studio strobes
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Macro filters
Macro filters. I have never tried these, and can therefore not give a first hand review. But, the method is that you can attach a filter in front of your lens, and achieve some result. They work like magnifying glasses.
I have anyway chosen to add them to this list of ways to do macro photography, because they are available, and because they are fairly cheap.
Macro filters are graded in diopter, where +1 being less and +10 being more (closer focus). You can also stack the filters. When stacking, you should place the filter, with the highest number, closest to the lens.
With macro filters it can be harder to focus.

Information If you don't want to invest in a macro lens, then maybe this solution is right for you. On Amazon a set of macro filters can be found from £8.50. - This is the cheapest price I found, and it is only to give a clue at what the price level is at. Of all the methods explained here, I would though suggest the bellows or a reverse-ring before this. I have no first hand experience with this, I must admit.